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2-up motorcycle travel

Mexico, Heading North

Bienvenido a Mexico.

Welcome Back.

Crossing back into Mexico from Central America is as easy as crossing from the United States. Navigating the throngs of people selling and buying things you will probably never need is tricky as people are like big rats moving everywhere, crossing as soon as you pass. Watching my mirrors as much as what’s in front of me I stop just in time as a person tries to cut just at the rear of our motorcycle and almost into the trailer that they never saw.

Today we are on our way to Palenque despite the warnings of men on the road stopping traffic looking for money. This has been a warning since we entered Mexico, not to ride the south route into Palenque. We bypassed this road the first time through but want to see a couple of things up this road so we are going that way today.

Stopping at a Wal-Mart that a small customized motorcycle and a rider with a black jacket and patches pulls in right behind us. He had seen us coming into town and followed us to the Wal-Mart. Slowly getting off his bike and taking off his helmet we greet in Spanish and realize quickly that neither of us speak the others primary language. He is there to say hi and offer us any assistance we may need in the southern part of Mexico. Exchanging email addresses and telephone numbers he gets back on his bike and rides away promising to be there is and when we may need anything. He tells us there have been reports of several men on the road north, but no reports today.

Heading out of town toward Palenque we round every corner tentatively as if the devil himself would be waiting for us. The road’s condition continues to deteriorate with every mile with wheel eating potholes and chunks of pavement missing. Since we have not seen anything yet and we are over half way there we start to relax. Rounding a corner half of the road is missing and there are the men stopping traffic at the perfect roadblock. Half of the road is missing, which is our lane, with a drop-off and the other side is the mountain.

There were orange cones and large rocks up directing traffic around the wash-out and around the immediate area were about 8-10 guys with machetes. It didn’t take long to realize that these were the banditos we had been warned about. While we were waiting our “turn”, two little kids came over to us and tried to sell us something to eat. First a truck in the opposite lane went through and paid. Following the truck, a car went through, then the cones were moved back into place in the middle of the road, wide enough for a bike to go through, but maybe not the trailer. We entered the cones where the guys were standing and I hit the gas, thinking FUCK YOU GUYS, I”M NOT PAYING. With the guys yelling, machetes waving and rocks whistling through the air (watch the guy on the left as we ride past pick up a rock), we roared off. So, this was our excitement today. The road sucked with topes and missing sections of road all the way out to Palenque. It took over 6 hours to ride only 190 kms.

Running the blockaid

As we quickly ride through corners the chunks of missing pavement go to whole lanes and we bounce and skid and slide through the turns making sure we aren’t being followed. Pulling into Palenque we are happy to see our hotel is in the jungle with only one-way in. Recounting our story to the reception desk we find out this is common here and we aren’t the first ones to have run this blockade.

 

We ate at the hotel’s on-site restaurant tonight amid the evening cries of birds and Howler Monkeys, an eerie sound in the darkening day. Tomorrow we will be taking a tour bus to Aqua Azul Waterfalls, Misol-Ha Waterfalls and Zona Arqueológica ruins. We want to swim and the pavement is more of a challenge than I want to do two days in a row.

Aqua Azul Waterfalls, (Spanish for “Blue Water Falls”), consists of many cataracts following one after another. The larger cataracts may be as high as 6 meters (20 feet) or so.

Misol-Ha Waterfalls is one single cascade of 35 m of height that falls into a single almost circular pool admits tropical vegetation. The water is of clear blue color due to its high mineral content. Behind the cascade there is a cave of approximately 20 meters in length.

 

Leaving Palenque our next town will be Taxco but we end up staying in a couple other towns along the way with nice little hotels and even nicer hosts and a couple memorable meals when it looked like there was nothing else around. The first was a little street side kabob run by a small family with each of the three having their own distinct duty, the father cooking the meat street side and the mother prepping the food. The seven-year-old son was the host seating the patrons as they arrived, taking orders and attending to the needs of the customers. A more polite and responsible boy would be difficult to find. Such is Mexico, all family members working together.

The next night we found a hotel high up on the bluffs overlooking the town. The drive up the hill was actually one of the steepest we had encountered on the entire trip. Cursing silently, we continued up the hill because stopping would have probably meant a backward slide and an unwanted get off. The views from the top made the ride worth the trip with panoramic views of the city below in the sunset. The elegant restaurant with fireplace was a definite plus and the meal was good and inexpensive.

Taxco, the city of silver. Taxco is built into the side of a mountain so a flat, straight road is impossible to find. Our hotel for the next couple of night is a spa and up a couple very steep roads with sharp corners where if you had to stop one leg would find nothing but air between the bottom of your boot and the pavement. Melanie wanted off so she took Gypsy and told me when the busy street crowded with VW bug taxis was clear so I didn’t have to stop. One wrong turn led to a multi-point turnaround with my trailer as I blocked traffic full of very patient drivers.

The city of Taxco was heavily associated with silver, both with the mining of it and other metals and for the crafting of it into jewelry, silverware and other items. Today tourism has replaced silver as the main economic activity.

Exploring the compact, hilly city is the easiest way and then when sufficiently lost, a VW taxi is always waiting to take you back. There are several churches with amazing histories all within view of the back balcony of our hotel. The owner spoke great English and grew up in Taxco. He was very proud of his homeland and took time away from his day to point out the places to visit from the balcony viewpoint. He shared with us that he had grown up in this very building, an orphanage at the time. Having great memories of growing up, when it came up for sale a few years ago as an inn, he couldn’t resist purchasing the place for his own.

One of the highlights of a visit to Taxco is the newly discovered abandoned mine. One of the hotels, the Hotel Posada de la Misión since 1940, was doing a remodel of its bar three years ago. After digging up the tiles in an area of the bar they arrived the next morning to discover the tools they had left on the exposed dirt were missing, through a small hole in the excavating area. Researching the hole further revealed an old mine with existing veins of gold and silver. The tour is very cool you descend in an elevator down four stories and hike down to a depth of about 150 feet. If you are feeling energetic you can also rappel 300 feet to the bottom. This is a great tour full of history and to find this mine directly below the hotel and city is amazing.

Tomorrow, through the middle of Mexico City.

 

Cheers

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Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Horizons Unlimited, Mexico, motorcycle travel | Leave a comment

Headed Back to Mexico

After my great 60th birthday surprise we headed back to San Ramon and see Donna for a few days before heading back north. Just up the hill from Donna’s place live Joe and Helena, a couple expats that now live in Costa Rica.  They have a great bar in their home, the El Cordero Negra, AKA “The Clandestine Pub”. This place has a great atmosphere, good brews on tap and my favorite Scotch, Laphroaig, from the Isle of Islay. (Side note, I am visiting them to collect the rent on my property there this summer.) We had a great evening sampling beer/Scotch and talking about all sorts of things travelers talk about.

A few days later we headed to the border and stopped at a great place at La Cruz. This town is a few miles from the coast but as I rounded the corner coming into town the views of Salinas Bay on the border of CR and Nico were amazing. We found an Airbnb in town for $17 per night, fantastic place and owners and just a short walk into town to Mirador Punta Descartes, a neat hostel with million-dollar view, a bar and good food. The beach was a few miles away so we spent an extra day exploring the area and swimming in the blue waters of the Pacific.

The crossing into back Nicaragua sucked like expected talking several hours and costing more than it should. We decided to cross over to Ometepe Island in Lake Nicaragua and found a hostel, Hospedaje Soma, (hospedajesoma.com) owned by a couple expats. They figured out how to run a good hostel as everything is run on the honor system, just pay when you leave, very European. Ometepe Island is composed of two small islands connected on the edge like two eggs in a frying pan, the yokes being two large volcanoes, Volcán Conceptión and Volcán Maderas. We rode over to the smaller island and to a natural swimming hole, Ojo de Agua. This is a great shaded area around a developed natural swimming hole with a restaurant and refreshments served to you as you sit in the provided chair at the water’s edge. It was very relaxing as we swam, chatting with many other travelers with the same idea.

Our next border crossing from Nicaragua into Honduras turned into a bad dream, souring us from returning to Nicaragua again. My trip to South America will be a flight into Columbia for us and our bike next time. It all started off Nico normal with the onslaught of fixers wanting to help you get through the perplexing mess of incompetence and corruption that they accept. Again, the trailer and Gypsy were an issue so I handed over my documents to the head fixer and away we went looking for the most corrupt guy in the complex. At a snail’s pace progress was made until we finally got everything was finished, except for the crossing. As we got back to the bike and Melanie our guy jumped on a scooter and took off with our documents and the others said to follow him to the border.  We quickly geared up and followed to where he was waiting to watch him continue about two kilometers and pull in to the side of a patrol station where he was joined by three of his friends. Demanding money for the return of my documents the four men became aggressive at an area that seemed to be familiar with this type of behavior as the station attendants ignored us and our plight. We handed over some cash and they were demanding more, suggesting I return to the border and get more cash. My limit had been crossed and I got aggressive yelling at them and letting them know what and where they do and go. They did back off and gave us our documents back and we left. In total, we crossed the Nicaragua border four times with a terrible and frustrating experience each time we crossed. My suggestion if you ever head that way is to travel simply and never use a fixer for anything there. To me, Nicaragua was the least favorite country I went through and I will probably never return, opting to fly from the US to Columbia when I continue my trip south through the Americas.

We rolled back through Honduras stopping in Copan again to see some friends. While we were wandering around town we came across a nice steak house, the Carnitas Nia Lola. They would cook your steak over a wood fired grill inside the restaurant as you were watching. It was a funky restaurant with a bunch of US memorabilia around, including HD posters. We had an excellent meal for our last night in Honduras.

The next day we crossed into Guatemala wanting to stop in Antigua since we missed that city on the way south. Antigua is a wonderful city and easy to visit. We wandered around the downtown square watching families and tourists mingle and enjoy the wonderful weather and views from the city.

I was approached by several young boys carrying a shoe shine boxes who thought my terribly dirty boots needing sprucing up a bit. Finally giving in I sat down as my chosen one sat in front of me and worked through the caked-on mud, rubbed black polish on with his hands and proceeded to polish my boot with a snap of his polishing rag to a spit polish shine on those old boots that any military person could have been proud of.

We had been informed of a place called the Londoner Pub where overland travelers seemed to gather for good English pub fare and live music. As we sat eating rather good fish and chips and enjoying the entertainment some guys, Moritz Alexa, Phillip Berini and one other, walked in and up to the bar. They were obviously motorcycle riders from different countries, so we joined them and had a great time drinking and telling stories of the road. As a PS, we met up with one of the riders, Moritz Alexy from Germany, at the Overland Expo West in Flagstaff, AZ a couple months later. We had a great time telling various lies from the road and finally called it a night while we all could all still stagger back to our hotels.

Headed to Mexico tomorrow, so…

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel | Leave a comment

Costa Rican Birthday Surprise

The time finally arrived!

I knew something was up and Melanie had been keeping a secret from me. Most things we do aren’t planned other than a plane we must catch or someplace we need to be on a certain day. Day to day we just figure out where we are headed the following day. This time Melanie was asking how long would we be staying in Costa Rica, quite unusual. Then she had the idea to go to Tamarindo on the northern Pacific coast around my birthday. OK, she just wanted to go somewhere special, but no clues. My friends that were riding around Central America and Mexico had either stayed north or were already in South America, so that was out. The day came and we packed up with Gypsy in tow and headed off to the coast.

We pulled into town and she insisted on riding to a petrol station and finding fuel to top off the tank. Another flag as it was late afternoon and time for a bite for lunch. Searching out the perfect restaurant we park and get off the bike when I hear a familiar voice from behind with a question about where to get some good food around here. I turn around to see my son Rick, his wife Kelly and my little granddaughter Lucy Belle standing there. What a shock! They had flown down from Atlanta, GA to surprise me for my 60th birthday. I was just beside myself as this was probably the best surprise/gift I had ever received.

Enjoying lunch over a couple drinks the plans were told. This surprise had been in the works since the previous September with careful planning, condo renting, passport buying for Lucy (she’s only 13 months old) and airline ticket purchases. They are really a bunch of sneaky people.

We spent the next 5 days together playing on the beach and in the pool, driving up to Rincón de la Vieja Volcano in the Guanacaste Province, visiting and playing cards. On the visit to the volcano we passed a hot spring and decided we would return for a soak. After a walk through the jungle followed by a suspended bridge crossing we came to a great setting of cascading rock pools of clear thermally warmed water spilling over the edges to the stream below us. We all had a very relaxing 5 days that I will remember forever.

Special thanks to Melanie for helping in the planning of this surprise and being so out of character and not letting it slip. And another huge Thank You to Rick and Kelly for taking the time out of your busy schedules for making this trip down for my birthday. Seeing little Lucy Belle and you guys sure made the birthday a special one.

Cheers,

Greg, Dad and Grandpa

Melanie, Mom and Grandma

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Costa Rica, motorcycle travel, Volcanoes, VStrom | Leave a comment

New Zealand, Fantastic Glaciers

 

After a great day on the boat we woke up to another beautiful day for riding and headed south. We were turning inland on State Highway 7 to Hamner Springs and Lewis Pass. It’s the northernmost of the three main passes across the Southern Alps, it is higher than the Haast Pass, slightly lower than Arthur’s Pass and second in elevation at 864 meters.

Our stop for the night would be Hamner Springs, so we passed by the turnoff and headed for a ride over the pass where we would grab something to eat and then backtrack over the pass again. The ride was beautiful with lower pastureland progressing to vistas above the cloud levels.

Arriving to town later in the day and with a forecast for rain, we decided to spend a couple nights and go to Hamner Hot Springs the following day. The Hot Springs are a complex of pools, some rock and some concrete, with varying water temperatures from the mid 90’s to over 104 degrees. It was a wonderful time just relaxing and soaking in the therapeutic waters. The downtown area was charming reminiscent of a small New England town. As we were walking through town we were overcome with the desire to sample a coffee and wonderful homemade scone while sitting at a small table on the sidewalk.

It’s overcast and threatening rain in the morning as we pack up and head south toward an Airbnb in Timaru. Arriving to town it is pouring buckets and we are both drenched to the bone and having a difficult time finding our Airbnb. Finally, we locate it and our host shows us in not real concerned about the puddles that quickly form around us. Showing us to our room he says not to worry about paperwork right now, just to get dry and warm up with a cup of tea. A couple other guys are staying also, friends from Austria and Germany. We end up in a conversation about the world wars and we are amazed how little we know about this subject. As the discussion progresses our New Zealand host gets on his computer, which is connected to a big TV, and starts pulling up maps and border changes for the past several hundred years throughout Europe. The discussion is super interesting and we walk away amazed at how much wasn’t taught to us in school and how much we take away from this spirited 2-hour discussion.

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The night sees the rain end and our ride to Tekapo and Mount Cook promises to be fantastic. Riding into town the views from the south side of Lake Tekapo looking north are amazing and we find a campsite near the edge of the water on a little bluff looking down on the beach. Perfect!

Near Tekapo, the University of Canterbury Mount John Observatory (UCMJO) has an astronomical research observatory. It is situated at 1,029 meters atop Mount John. In June 2012, an area of 1,700 sq. miles around the observatory was declared as the Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve by the International Dark-Sky Association, one of only four such reserves around the world. This is home to many telescopes, including HERCULES (High Efficiency and Resolution Canterbury University Large Echelle Spectrograph), and the observational wing of the Japanese/New Zealand MOA collaboration (Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics). Wow, this is quite a place and the views of the only small town around are incredible with views of the lake, snow caps peaks and glaciers, and the blue sky each commanding their own piece of the beauty. While we are at the observatory we hear an American accent. It happens to be an American doctor and his family. He is a ER physician, practicing in Australia, on vacation to New Zealand with his wife and three kids. We talk for a bit and his wife who is a nurse used to work at the very hospital I was born at in Cooperstown, New York.

Getting back to camp we see a car coming down the road and it’s our friends that were staying in Timaru the night before. They go and catch a soak at the nearby springs and come back, setting up their tents beside ours. Setting out our solar Lucy light as our campfire, we finish off a bottle of Scotch, talking into the night.

Before leaving in the morning we connect with FB and head out for a visit to Hooker Glacier on Mount Cook. Again, the views are incredible with blue skies and we ride along the west side of Lake Pukaki on Mount Cook Road with the views of the glaciers in front of us getting larger around every corner as we get closer and closer.

Finally, at the end of the lake the Hooker Glacier looms ahead of us, thrusting up into the clouds and down to where it finally meets the land. The road ends at the Aoraki Mount Cook Village and we stop in for a coffee on the deck of the Hermitage Hotel, with views of the glacier right in front of us.

Wanting to stay on the coast again we push on and start following the Waitaki River and decide that a short cut is in order to save some time. Turning at Duntroon we set off on a good road that soon turns to dirt and twists and turns, up and down over what I find out is Danseys Pass and one of the prettiest passes in all New Zealand. Our short cut turns out to be much more time, but the beauty and stopping to get pictures is the cause. Mid-way through we stop at the first place we have seen, the Danseys Pass Coach Inn, for a drink. They are getting ready for an event and are too busy to even get us a glass of water. Hmmm!

There was a nice campground in Moeraki on a hill overlooking the ocean and beach that we wanted to try. After setting up camp and cooking supper we wandered down to the beach for a stroll. As we walked down the beach with the setting sun, the wail of the pipes could be heard in the distance. A solo bagpiper was facing the sunset and playing “Amazing Grace”, one of my Dad’s favorites, on the pipes. As Melanie and I stood silently watching and listening, with a warm heart, I could feel the spirit of my Dad standing beside me. Such a great moment to enjoy.DSCF2333

The Pipes are Calling (click for video)

Stopping in Dunedin again we had decided to take the Taieri Gorge Railways from the historic Dunedin Railway Station. This station was built in 1906 to serve the railway that had already been in operation between Christchurch and Dunedin and, in 2006, was recognized by DK Eyewitness Travel as one of “The World’s 200 Must-See Places”. The building is Flemish renaissance style and is constructed of dark basalt from Kokonga in the Strath-Taieri with lighter Oamaru stone facings, giving it the distinctive light and dark pattern common to many of the grander buildings of Dunedin and Christchurch. The southern end is dominated by the 37-meter clock tower visible from much of central Dunedin.

The ride we were taking would leave Dunedin and pass through Taieri Gorge, negotiating this narrow and exhilarating river gorge and awesome landscapes and literally turning around in Pukerangi, making its way back to Dunedin. The carriages were all original, built around 1915, and had been restored to their previous elegance. It was a wonderful journey full of incredible vistas and surprises around every corner.

After the train ride, we headed north toward Oamaru where we would camp for the night and have an opportunity to see the small Blue-Eyed penguins come to shore in the dark after being at sea all day. We got to the road which they cross before dark, and soon there was one, then two until a several all stopped at the edge of the road, then waddled across, headed to their homes on the side of the hills.

 

Our trip was almost over so we took the bike back to Lindsey’s friend’s house and headed to Christchurch for a couple days, sightseeing and relaxing before our five days in Fiji.

The airline we flew, Fiji Air, offered first class service and a free stopover in Fiji. We found a great hostel on the beach for only $US25 per night.

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, BMW, Horizons Unlimited, motocamping, motorcycle travel, New Zealand | Leave a comment

Costa Rica

I was still fuming the first few miles of Costa Rica after feeling so violated from the Nicaragua border crossing.  I finally calmed down since it was in the past, and there wasn’t much that I could do about it, and made the turn out of Canas toward Laguna de Arenal.  The road ascends on a curvy road eventually reaching the lake and following the contours on a narrow road to our hotel high on a bluff, overlooking Laguna de Arenal.

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Laguna de Arenal

In the late afternoon, Gypsy and I took a walk from the hotel and find a small trail leading to a peninsula jutting out into the lake. It is so very peaceful that all you can hear is the rustle of leaves and breaking twigs beneath our feet as we slowly make our way to the water’s edge. Gypsy froze as we hear a small twig break to our right and see a flurry of a moving animal through the branches about 10 meters off the side of the trail. Peering into the woods I see what appears to be a large racoon with a black and white striped tail, the tail pointed straight to the sky. I see one, then two, and as my eyes adjust and focus on the animals, about 12 appear. They look at us as startled to see us as we are to see them, and turn and silently disappear into the woods. I later find out they are the Costa Rican Coatimundi, a racoon like creature.

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Coatimundi

We spend the next few days enjoying the lake views, volcano views and hot springs. There is a stream running near the road that is heated thermally from the volcanoes in the area. You can go to a resort for $US65, or stop at the bridge down from the resorts and enjoy the babbling, terraced warm stream for free. Of course, we opt for the free stream and change into our swim suits at the edge of the water and lounge in the soothing waters for an hour or so.

While there we are told about a bridge outside of La Fortuna called Iguana Bridge. It seems that Iguanas just hang out at the bridge to have their pictures taken. We ride over to see if it’s true and find a few just waiting in the branches of trees, some close enough to reach out and touch.

While we are still at Lake Arenal, a friend of mine from Minnesota, Donna Kennedy, contacts us and offers us a place to stay at a place she owns north of San Ramon in a beautiful place called Angel Valley. Donna is a motorcycle traveler and LD rider and we are part of the same national and international communities. Angel Valley is at an elevation just meters below the Villa Blanca Cloud Forest.

She is not using it at the time, so we take her up on her generous offer and base ourselves for a couple of weeks of exploration out of her beautiful Inn. The Angel Valley Bed and Breakfast is opening again soon and will be a stopover place for overlanders to recharge and explore the area.

Riding down to Angel Valley from La Fortuna we follow a great road that twists and turns through many eco systems with views of Volcan Arenal for the first few miles. Donna had recommended a place partway down called Lands in Love Hotel and Resort. It is known for the chocolate cake and coffee they serve so we had to stop and see what all the fuss was about. I believe this is the richest dark chocolate cake I have ever eaten and the fresh ground Costa Rican coffee is the perfect combination.

The first area to be explored is an area around the Poás Volcano, north of San Ramon. We take off on some back roads and finally reach Parque Nacional Volcan Poás, and walk to an observation area above the duel crater and lake.

The views are fantastic and we just stand there and enjoy the cool breezes and views. Leaving the park, we head north on 126 to Cataratas Arallanes, a great waterfall that is right beside the road.IMG_20170217_111904889_HDR Deciding to let Mr. Garmin help us with a shortcut back was again a mistake as the road headed toward Volcan Poás and terrible gravel to a washout without a road and through what seemed to be a cow pasture. At this point I decided to use my compass and try to find a way to a road I knew ran north/south and back toward where we were staying. After an interesting couple of hours, we ended up about 5kms north of the gravel road to the Inn.

Donna let us know of a Tope happening in Punta Arenas on Saturday. We thought it was a festival but it turned out to be a night parade of Mexican/Pacifino horses all doing a high step. This is an important tradition in Costa Rica dating from colonial times. The horses are beautiful and we enjoy the festivities surrounding the entire event.

My rear tire was down to maybe 1000kms left when I noticed to screw in the tread. A quick plug fixed the problem, but I still needed a tire. Most of the shops you come across deal with small bikes, thus small size tires. A recommended shop in town carried the size rear tire I needed, but all the tires were all tied up in customs with new regulations, and had been for two weeks. Seems nobody has this common size tire. A post on FB saved the day as Sandy Borden from California knew the guys from Touratech Costa Rica and they had one tire of the size I needed. A little less dirt and more road than I wanted, but it’s still a good tire. Thanks Sandy and Touratech CR!IMG_20170224_085556157

Our next ride takes us through San Jose and over to a couple active volcanoes, Volcan Turrialba and Volcan Irazú. The ride and day were beautiful and mid-day we stop to get money out of our ATM. Well, neither of our Wells Fargo cards work.   A phone call to them reveals they think we have exceeded our limit for the day which was impossible.  I drew money out of the bank after my cards stopped working but why have an ATM card that doesn’t work?  Time for a new bank when we return.

We are riding through lush green, tropical rainforest terrain, through small villages and enjoying the afternoon when the blue skies turn dark and the rain starts. Seems like this is needed to keep things lush and green. After about an hour of medium to light rain we arrive at the beautiful valley of Orosi, and find our hostel, the House of Coffee. We are the only ones there and, as it is still raining and now dark, we unpack and I head out to find some food to cook. Looks like chicken, noodles and fresh veggies are on the menu for tonight. Our host gets home from her job later and we sit and chat and realize, again, how lucky we are.

The next day the skies are bright blue, the air is cool and everything is green, such beautiful contrasts in this little valley. Riding toward town and crossing a little one-lane suspension bridge we find a little bakery to have our morning meal while standing beside the bike on such a beautiful morning. We hop on Pan-American Highway 2 for a twisting ride through Parque Nacional Los Quetzales on the way to the Pacific coast, and our destination for the night, the Wide Mouth Frog Hostel in Quepos. Neat little hostel near downtown with great secure parking for the bike. Quepos is near the Manuel Antonio Nacional Parque, a fabulous area boosting sloths and turtles. We see neither as you must be lucky to see them, so we hear.

Heading back to San Miguel we stop at Crocodile Bridge to see the famous crocodiles. These huge beasts just hang out under the bridge, some at least 4 meters in length.

You must wonder why they stay here, stationary in the water and on the banks. What kind of critters are being dropped off the bridge for them to feast on…

Cheers

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Central America, Costa Rica, Horizons Unlimited, Volcanoes, VStrom | Leave a comment

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