motorcycle travel

Denmark to the Netherlands

We arrived at the ferry port the time we were told to be there and were first in line. That’s OK. Get something to drink and pull out the ukulele to entertain the masses.

This was an overnight ferry that seemed more like a cruise ship. It was a beautiful ship and very nice. We pulled on board at the designated time and secured the bike to the deck, along with about 50 other bikers. Finding the stairs to the upper decks we found our room, stowed our gear and headed to the open decks on top. We had a couple drinks and sat with a couple other riders about their upcoming journeys. While on board this Danish vessel I went to the ATM to get some new currency, not knowing it was going to give me Norwegian Krones. If anyone is traveling to Norway next year, I’ll trade you for Pounds, Euros or Dollars.

We arrived at the port in Hitshals, Denmark in the morning. The skies were threatening with the promise of a couple days of bad weather. The hightailed it east, away from the storm front to a small, isolated AirBnB near the coast. This was a nice one room hut in a farmer’s back yard, about 100 meters from the house. We had heat, nice full-sized bed, and a small kitchen with refrigerator. Perfect! We quickly unloaded and ran into town to get some groceries for the next couple of days. We almost made it, catching the rain just before we got back to our hut.

After relaxing and catching up on electronic communication (FREE, good Wi-Fi), we headed to a small-town south of Copenhagen to see a friend and do some motorcycle maintenance on the bike. He was a US citizen back at the Hobbit house that he had grown up in. He was taking care of his elderly mother and had invited us to stay for a while. While I can’t disclose who he was, we had a fantastic time with them, made some lifelong friends and can’t wait to see them again. We toured Copenhagen with them and were fascinated at the number of bicycles we saw. They were parked everywhere. On boats in the canals, on streets and in multi-story bicycle parking garages. The rush hour traffic consisted of bicycles with men in suits, women in dresses and everything else you could imagine.

After a few days of having fun with the best host and hostess ever, it was time to move on. It was threatening rain again, so we put on our yellow rain suits. It had the desired effect, it never rained. Our destination was a campground on the levee in Germany, just north of the border of the Netherlands. We stopped in Hamburg to visit Miniatur Wunderland, an enormous model railway system based on famous global sights. Each of the different section highlighted an area with light town and cities, moving vehicles on roads and, of course, trains. It just defied description. We followed that with a Big Red Bus tour of the city and then left for the coast.

Staying on small roads as close to the coast as possible, we made slow progress but had a wonderful ride. The campground was across the road from the levee that towered maybe 100 feet about the campground. It was a beautiful setting with good wind block and green grass all around us. There was a small restaurant at the campground, and I had to try the Seafood Pizza. It had shrimp, mussels, calamari, and fish on a dough pizza with a red sauce. Fantastic! The next day we rode toward Amsterdam.

We would be here for a couple of nights. The following morning, we would catch the train into downtown Amsterdam and look around. Again, the public transportation was easy and inexpensive. We decided to do the on/off bus tour, which also included a boat tour of the canals. We enjoy these as we also get a narration of what we are seeing. Stopping in the downtown area we had to visit the Original Dampkring Coffeeshop of Amsterdam. It has a most captivating menu of smokables and edibles. We followed that with a visit to Vleminckx Sausmeesters, serving homemade fries since 1887. The original munchies joint, I would think. Of course, no visit to Amsterdam is complete without a beer at Delirium Café.

The next morning, we packed up camp and headed south to the beach. Our ferry for the UK would not be leaving for a few hours so we had some time to waste. There wasn’t much to see, or so we thought. Stopping at a seafood kiosk to look at the water, the owner of the business came out to say hello. We ended up talking for a while and he invited us to eat some seafood, desert and a coffee. While talking he told us of a motorcycle track just on the other side of the berm, which we couldn’t see from the road. We rode around the corner and right up to the track to watch some open track day for people in the area.

Off to the UK, and The Overland Event.

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Denmark, Europe, Horizons Unlimited, motocamping, motorcycle travel, Netherlands, Suzuki VStrom1000, VStrom | Leave a comment

Norway to Denmark

The next morning was again beautiful with clear blue skies. I hiked from the campground to the Storfossen waterfall just as the sun was cresting the mountain. The sunrise made for some amazing pictures. The water was cascading down the steps of the falls with the sun sparkling off the foaming water.

After breakfast we continued up the mountain on Route 63, toward another fantastic, not-to-miss pass. With great pavement and sweeping curves we climbed toward two large waterfalls, the Kvanndalsfossen and the Forfriskendefossen. We stopped briefly to look at both falls and headed to the top of the pass where the road turns left and winds steeply to the top of the Dalsnibba Mountain Plateau at a height of 1500 meters (4291 feet). The views are incredible in all directions. Feeling like we on top of the world we just stared out in amazement.

Continuing on, the road runs along the crest of the mountain providing incredible views before heading downhill to another small fjord, the Innvikfjorden. There is an arm of the Jostedalsbreen glacier that feeds a river to two glacier lakes on the way to the fjord. I saw several camping areas on the lakes, one being next to a small bridge, crossing the river connecting the two lakes. They had a great spot for us right on the lake looking skyward to a small glacier just across the river. Canoe rentals were available, and the price was, FREE! We hopped in one and canoed the length of the second lake to see the large glacier from the water. It was spectacular!

The next morning, we rode toward the glacier, and the end of the road. We decided not to hike up as we didn’t want to leave our gear in the parking lot, so we continued. We have an Austrian friend, Anita, that was near us and we had decided the tonight would be the best day to meet and camp together.

There are a couple stave churches on the way to Flam. One of them is a UNESCO Romanesque church, the Urnes Stave Church. It is listed as the oldest stave church and was built around 1130. There is a ferry crossing to get to the church, so we passed and went to the other one. The other one, the Borgund stavkyrkje (stave church), was built around 1190 on stone foundations, is exceptionally well preserved and is the most distinctive stave church in Norway. The church has beautiful, lavishly carved portals, five carved crosses and dragons on the roof. The area surrounding the church is rich in cultural heritage. The Vindhellavegen, part of the King’s Road across Filfejell is designated one of Norway’s most beautiful roads.

We backtracked a few miles to a crossroad of old and new. The new Lærdalstunnelen is the longest road tunnel in the world. The tunnel is a 24.51-kilometre-long (15.23 mi) long road with blue-lit rest areas and speed averaging, so be careful, speeding tickets are expensive in Norway. The old road FV243 climbs over the mountain offering spectacular views and a picnic/hiking area at the top. We had lunch fixings with us, so we took a break and enjoyed the sunshine and the views.

Anita is part of a team of female riders, the Grizzly Race Team. The team set a woman’s world record in 2018 for riding around the world. She was riding to Nordkapp with her friend, Yvonne. They were moving quickly, as would be expected, and made time in their travels to camp with us for the night. They arrived later in the afternoon. After setting up their camp at Flam Camping og Vandrarheim we headed into town for some chow and a few beers. We had a wonderful evening with good friends and in the morning, parted paths.

We were catching the ferry out of Bergen in a couple days, so we found a campground on the outskirts of the city. The first night we set up camp but the next morning we checked to see if there was a cabin available. Since we had to catch the ferry first thing in the morning, we decided a cabin would be easier. Yes, there was a nice small cabin available so we could move over immediately. We tossed everything in the room and grabbed the bus into Bergen.

Public transportation is so easy over here once you understand it. Getting to town was easy as the bus stop was right across from the campground. We bought our ticket ay the gas station out front and went and stood at the bus stop. I followed our route on map.me and when we got close to downtown, we jumped off. Getting back was a different story. We got on the wrong bus at got off at the next stop. We thought we then knew where we were going. Nope, wrong again. I had to convince Melanie I finally got it figured out. We only had to walk one mile, in the rain, to get back to where we had gotten off the bus coming into town. Great! Only 45 minutes until the bus gets here. Time for lunch, a beer and chips.

But, back to Bergen. The downtown area was very scenic. There was a large four-sided memorial in the square dedicated to the sea farers throughout history. The wharf area has an expensive fish market just as you arrive. The prices were outrageous, and the market was full of cruise tourists. We didn’t eat there as it was definitely out of our budget, hence the gas station beer and chips for lunch. On the far side of the wharf was an area referred to as Bryggen. It was the old medieval wharf in the historic harbour district known for its colorful, wooden-clad boat houses. Standing on the other side of the harbour we were able to get some wonderfully scenic tour guide photos.

The next morning, we packed up the bike and headed to the ferry port, destination Denmark.

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Europe, Horizons Unlimited, motocamping, motorcycle travel, Norway, Suzuki VStrom1000, VStrom

Central Norway

Just south of our BnB was the fourth largest city in Norway, Trondheim. The settlement was founded in 997 as a trading post, and it served as the capital of Norway during the Viking Age until 1217.IMG_20190730_113219881_BURST000_COVER

Riding into the old town is relatively easy, considering all the one-way streets. The Nidaros Cathedral is visible protruding high into the skyline as we weave our way closer and closer.
Parking in front of Nidoros Cathedral, we walk toward the imposing structure. The cathedral is part of the Church of Norway and was built over the burial site of King Olav II (c. 995-1030, reigned 1015-1028), who became the patron saint of the nation. Initial construction lasted 230 years (1070-1300), and continued 7 centuries, until 2001. It was Catholic until the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century and it became Evangelical Lutheran. Nidaros is the northernmost medieval cathedral in the world.
The city was still busy as Olav Days had just finished, celebrating King Olav II. The West Front consists of a rose window above the crucifixion and 57 statues.IMG_20190730_113604556
As we were leaving the cathedral and walking toward the old bridge we walked near the bike. A parking enforcement officer was standing behind Yellow Donkey. I stood at a distance so as not to have to interact with him. I learned that lesson in Czechia. After he finally left, I walked over to the bike. He had cleaned my dirty tag and, seemingly becoming confused, left. The old gate and bridge are around the corner so we walked over, got a picture, and rode out of town before the attendant returned with backup.IMG_20190730_114608628

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Old Gate to the Walled City

There are a couple of travelers that were coming from the south. Lisa Morris and Jason Spafford rode motorcycles for 4 years around the Americas, south to north. They are now in a tricked out, 4-wheel rig and driving from the UK to Nordkapp, Iceland and down to South Cape, the “Cape to Cape”. They are good friends and since we were near each other, thought we could camp together on the epic Atlantic Road.

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The Atlantic Road

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Hello Friends

We rode in from the north not knowing where they were. Just as we crossed the high bridge, there they were. Such a treat! After we had a coffee, Jason found the perfect spot to camp, or so we thought.IMG_20190730_222626250
With the ‘psst’ of the opening of beer cans, we toasted our trips and the good fortune of being able to do this on the road. Lisa fixed a fantastic meal and we all feasted like royalty. Nighttime came way to quickly and after a brilliant sunset, we headed to our tents.

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Great Meal, Lisa

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The photographer at work.

In the morning we were none to anxious to leave, so we sat around sipping on our piping hot coffee. We noticed a man pulling up in his truck. He walked our way and demanded money, since we had camped on his property. We protested, and he pointed out the well hidden signs. Welcome to progress and capitalism in central Norway. North of here, camp anywhere for free. From here south it gets very busy, so beware. Jason and I were really grumpy after this encounter, but more coffee and time eased the pain.
Leaving is the difficult part of traveling. Since both our lives are basically nomadic, you never know when you may see each other again.
We headed south and they north.
The Trollstigen pass was our next road on the map. Stopping first at Trollstigen Campground to get a picture of the trolls and a couple stickers, off we rode up the pass.IMG_20190731_144321116 IMG_20190731_144848522The pass starts to climb right away. Just as you near the top the road contorts itself into hairpin turns. Twisting back and forth you reach the viewing area nestled between the Trollveggan and other surrounding peaks. The Troll walkway guides your way to an overlook of Stigfossen and the incredible road below. As you stand there surrounded by such beautiful vistas you cannot help but be thankful that you are lucky enough to travel this way.

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Our road up.

IMG_20190731_180017839IMG_20190731_152313094You never feel as if you spent enough time in places like this, but it’s time to start looking for a camp for tonight. The Trollstigen ends at the Storfjorgan fjord, where a ferry takes you to the other side. We want to spend the night at the top of am arm of the Storfjorgan in Geivanger. We see there is a campsite right on the water. Perfect!

Just before reaching Geivanger the road has a hairpin turn at a veiwpoint some 1500 feet above the fjord. You can see the Seven Sisters waterfall from there and the cruise ships look like small Monopoly pieces. IMG_20190731_175337394_HDRIMG_20190731_175408649IMG_20190731_175652147IMG_20190731_180124889The road down from there consists of eleven, very tight hairpin turns on a very narrow road. Buses are not allowed on the road but two, traveling opposite directions, have become stuck and unable to pass. This has backed up traffic from the middle of the way down, both directions. The road is so tight and traffic so congested that even motorcycles are having a difficult time maneuvering past. The temperature has climbed as high as the emotions and we are glad to weave our way through to the camp at the bottom.

IMG_20190731_182524109The cruise ships and many cars in town should have been an indication got is to keep moving, but we stayed packed like sandines onto a patch of grass between other irritated campers. From today forward the crowds become overwhelming and I get a case of fjord/tourist-itis. It is getting time to leave Norway so we book our ferry out of Bergen to Denmark for a few days from now.

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Europe, motocamping, motorcycle travel, Norway, Suzuki VStrom1000, Trollstigen, VStrom | Leave a comment

Commitments…or a Great Family?

I’ve been riding most of my life. Several years ago, after several life changing events, we decided we had too much “stuff”. Our first world life of over zelious consumerism had developed a question mark, WHY? Why chase our tails to have more stuff when what we really wanted was to travel and make great memories. Our jobs took up most of our time and energy, and it was draining us.

Then we discovered Horizons Unlimited and saw the movie, “Long Way Down”. I had also met a man near me in Florida that had lost everything. He took off in a sidecar with his dog. I read a book, “Jupiter’s Travels”, by Ted Simon. I read about “2 Ride the World”, Simon and Lisa Thomas. I wanted more.

In 2010 we sold everything and took off in an RV, seeing America and working on the road. We saw the US and rode our motorcycle through every state. Then we did an international motorcycle trip, just us.

We were hooked.

We have since ridden in 57 countries, with several big rides sketched out on maps still to come.

This brings me to the topic of this blog.

Commitments…or a Great Family. A few years ago a friend, Ted, asked me “Why don’t you just go?”. I answered job, family, dog, etc, and he said “So!”.

We got to thinking, Why don’t we just go, why are commitments holding us back. Well, we decided that our commitments were a couple things of our lives we loved, family. It’s said that you can’t have it all. I thought, why not?

So we redesigned our lives. We had zero debt and our expenses are our lives, wherever we are. We didn’t need stuff. We didn’t need a home in one place. What we needed was the only thing you can’t have more of, time.

Now we don’t work and are thrifty with our money. We have bikes on three continents, all valued at a total of $8000. We ride, we camp and we cook.

But most importantly, we see our family.

You can have it all.

We take off next week to ride from Eastern Europe to Nordkapp, then back to the Overland Event in the UK.

Below is what we did the past couple months, with family.

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, family, Horizons Unlimited, motorcycle travel, Suzuki VStrom1000 | 1 Comment

Headed to Bulgaria, and Karma

Packing up and saying goodbye to our amazing hosts, we headed to Pamukkale.

From Google; ‘Pamukkale is a town known for the mineral-rich waters flowing down white travertine terraces on a nearby hillside. The town neighbors Hierapolis, an ancient Roman spa city founded around 190 BC. Ruins there include a well-preserved theater and a necropolis with sarcophagi that stretch for 2km. The Antique Pool is famous for its submerged Roman columns, the result of an earthquake.’

As we pulled into town, we were greeted by a man on a scooter whom wanted us to follow him to his hotel. He gave us a good rate with breakfast included and a view of the white travertine terraces, so we stayed. Walking through town several restaurant owners met us in the street to tell us a story about their eatery. We will choose one and return later.

The next morning, we walked up the terraced warm pools and swam in the Antique Pool. Just sitting on a submerged column, you wonder who else has been is this very place with 2000 years of history. The theater is very well preserved, and you enter from the top as it is built into the hillside.

Our next destination is Gallipoli, near the southern border with Greece. Anzac Cove is a small cove on the peninsula of Gallipoli. This area became famous during WW1 and the landing of the ANZAC’s (the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) on 25 April 1915. The campaign was doomed from the start after missing the intended landing site and mixed signals from the commanders. Since 1916 the anniversary of the landings on 25 April has been commemorated as Anzac Day, becoming one of the most important national celebrations in Australia and New Zealand. The anniversary is also commemorated in Turkey and the United Kingdom.

We stayed in Gallipoli at a small hotel frequented by Australians coming to this area. We met several, some ex-military, with extensive knowledge of the ANZAC campaign.

The next morning, we entered Greece and rode down to the “Three Fingers” of the Halkidiki Peninsula that stretch into the North Aegean Sea. The third “finger”, furthest east, of the Halkidiki Peninsula is Athos. Unlike Kassandra (#1), and Sithonia (#2), Athos has mostly been untouched by modern development. Most of Athos comprises the monastic community of Mt. Athos. The rules of visiting Mt. Athos are very strict. Only men aged 18 and up can visit since legends say that the Virgin Mary visited Athos and blessed it and therefore the Holy Mountain is considered the Garden of the Virgin and there is no room for other women. Men must get an advanced permit and book a visit up to six months ahead. Visitors must follow the monks’ lifestyle during their stay. We intended to ride around Sithonia but the route south along the eastern coast was blocked by a large forest fire. Disappointed, we rode back across the mountain to the east coast and found a great place on the water.

The next morning, we rode north toward Sofia, Bulgaria, where the Yellow Donkey would be spending a few months sleeping. Our friend in Sofia, Dimitar, had suggested for us to visit the Rila Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, in Bulgaria. We were given advice of a nice road to follow to get to the monastery. We had just ridden through a small town and some cars were parked along the road. As we slowly passed, we saw a woman laying on the ground in a small pool of blood. Several people standing around her. Quickly stopping the bike, I grabbed my first aid kit. With the language being a barrier, we figured out that she had been walking and had been hit by a car. Several people seemed upset with my decision to assist her. The injured woman had fear in her eyes as I checked her vitals and for injuries. Her injuries seemed to be a gash on the skull to which I applied pressure. Melanie had come by the woman’s side, talking softly and holding her bloodied hand. As she looked into Melanie’s eyes her stoic fear became tears as she tightly held Melanie’s hand. After several minutes an ambulance arrived, and I communicated my finding with them. With the injured woman still holing tightly to Melanie’s hand, she was loaded into the ambulance. With many non-verbal thank-yous, from the ambulance crew and bystanders, we acknowledged and continued our way to the Rila Monastery. The connection made through these gestures helps with other peoples view of Americans, while also refueling our karma bank.

Founded in the 10th century, the Eastern Orthodox Rila Monastery is regarded as one of Bulgaria’s most important cultural, historical and architectural monuments. The hermit, St Ivan of Rila, is whom the monastery is named after. He came to this area in the 10th century. Living in a cave, without material possessions, the monastery was built by his students where they came to receive an education. The oldest buildings in the complex date from this period -— the Tower of Hrelja (1334–1335) and a small church just next to it (1343). It is now inhabited by 60 monks.

We left and stopped for some soup along the road. This was a very friendy pup.

We headed to Sofia where we were met by Dimitar, who would be our generous host for the next couple days and would be taking care of Yellow Donkey for the next several months. Dimitar gave us a tour of Sofia and some favorites pubs, where a couple of his friends showed up. My BILT boots had just fallen apart during this trip so we found a motorcycle dealer in town. I found a pair of Forma Adventure boots at a great price, which, after hearing our story, were significantly discounted for me.  As we were preparing to leave, Dimitar presented me with a bottle of homemade Raki.  We had a great couple days in Sofia and all to soon had to be on our way.

Our flight back took us through London for an overnight, on Melanie’s birthday. Several of our friends came out to the pub for drinks and to help celebrate another trip around the rock. Many thanks to all that showed up.

Until next time…

Cheers,

2WANDRRs

Categories: 2-up motorcycle travel, 2WANDRRs, adventure travel, Greece, Horizons Unlimited, Monastery, motocamping, motorcycle travel, Suzuki VStrom1000, Turkey | 3 Comments

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